The Jornada Research Institute: From Mongolia To The American Southwest, A Monumental Apache Journey

On Sunday, January 19th, Henrietta Stockel will present at Casa de Suenos
restaurant on some of her most recent research. Her presentation will be
on the arrival of the Apache and their long journey here.

The Jornada Research Institute has arranged to occupy the south room of the restaurant, beginning at 6:00 pm for dinner for those who wish to have a meal before Henrietta’s presentation.
Announce yourself to the receptionist at the restaurant as attending the
JRI presentation.

We anticipate her presentation beginning at 6:45, after most have finished their meal, and we should conclude before 8:00 pm.

Seating is limited ca. 40 although we may be able to make room for a few
more. Dinner is not required but we appreciate your patronage of Casa de
Suenos for making this space available to us. Drinks are also available.

As participants in storytelling format, listeners join with H. Henrietta Stockel on a timeless Apache journey from Mongolia to southern Arizona,
southern New Mexico and northern Mexico. The audience learns previously
unknown facts about the people’s challenges along the way such as
geographical impediments, the climate, spirituality, and footwear. As a
recognized scholar of Apache history, Henrietta has accumulated a lengthy
resume’ of accomplishments, publications, and expertise on the Apaches.

Henrietta received her BA from Columbia University in 1972. Over the years, she has over 70 published articles on the history and cultures of the peoples of the southwest, with emphasis on Chiricahua Apache culture and history. She has 12 published books (listed below) and is working on a 13th, which is the focus of her presentation on January 19 th .

She has also appeared as an expert in two documentaries – one on Geronimo (1992, A & E, and History Channel) and one on the effects of tuberculosis among the Chiricahua Apache prisoners of war (1993, PBS) and was interviewed for a Television program: Arizona Illustrated – KUAT – Chiricahua Apache Culture and History – September 2004.

Henrietta has received several awards for her contributions to the study of the Apache cultures and is widely recognized for her expertise.

In addition, Henrietta has served as Adjunct Professor – Cochise College, Sierra Vista, Arizona, 1998-2008 on Chiricahua Apache Culture and History, as Emeritus lecturer – New Mexico State University – Alamogordo, Fall 2011 on “History in a Jiffy – The Apaches: Cultural transition, Cultural dispossession, Cultural oppression, Cultural recovery;” and as an Ethnohistorical consultant to an archeological project – Apache Moccasins in Utah Cave – University of Alberta – Edmonton, Canada, in 2015.

She is also the Co-Founder of the Southern New Mexico Public Lands Alliance (2016); appointed as a member of Otero County Public Lands Use Advisory Council (2017); is a Co-Founder of the Chiricahua Apache Research Center in Portal, Arizona (2018); and appointed as member at large to the Tularosa Basin Historical Society (2018).


We are fortunate to have Henrietta settle in Tularosa and extremely lucky to have her speak tonight on her recent studies with her presentation tonight entitled: From Mongolia to the American Southwest: A Monumental Apache Journey.

Visiting the Lincoln National Forest in New Mexico the easy way…

The Lincoln National Forest in New Mexico is part of the 154 national forests and 20 national grasslands in the United States administered by the USFS (United States Forest Service).
It is composed of 1,103,897 acres of forest proclaimed in 1902 as the Lincoln Forest Preserve.

With three ranger districts; The Sacramento, The Smokey Bear, and the Guadalupe districts, all contain parts of four different mountain ranges, including a good variety of environmental areas as well. Ranging from desert to heavily forested mountains and sub-alpine grasslands.

The Lincoln Forest Circuit is a network of communities in and around the Lincoln National Forest interconnected through Highway 70, 54, and 380 forming a circuit and making your visit easy. Traveling through the Circuit you will be able to enjoy the best things within our communities and the vast natural landmarks that surround our beautiful landscape.

Armed with this strategical piece of knowledge, you are now only in need of a map with a list of all the best places you must visit in order to enjoy the best experiences in our area. This is that list, with zero fluff!

Tour New Mexico; Observe Listen, Engage, and Learn.

Tour New Mexico; Observe, Listen, Engage, and Learn. An Awesome Way to Travel.

If you’re a visual learner, you’d be able to understand how important our senses are to learning.

Listening to experts, engaging in conversations, asking questions, and seeking further information helps stimulate our thinking process, challenges our preconceived notions and beliefs, and helps our minds grow.

For these and other reasons, Tours are an awesome way to experience New Mexico.

NOTE: Some of these tours are by appointment. If you are unable to find any specific info on the linked websites, give them a call. I’ve done my homework and all these tours are available as of March 2019.

Here is a list of Tours in our area you won’t be able to find anywhere else!

Click on any one of these if you’re interested in learning about the beautiful Land of Enchantment.

Authentic Southwestern Cuisine; New Mexico Style

New Mexican cuisine has its own unique style. It is not Mexican. It is not Mexican-American. And it’s definitely not Tex-Mex. It’s true to the Southwestern Spirit of New Mexico’s rich cultural heritage. It is a blend of American Cowboy, Native American, Spanish Colonial, and post-Columbian Mexican.

The Chiricahua, Comanche, Mescalero, and Navajo influence on New Mexican food is expressed through the use of piñones, corn, chile, beans, and squash.

The use of wheat, rice, and lamb were introduced to the Southwestern Cuisine by the Spaniards. Arroz con leche, atole, bizcochitos, calabacitas, and flan are some of the Spanish dishes that have come to enrich New Mexican traditions.

Another example of cultural influence in New Mexican cooking is the Puebloan Horno; a mud adobe-built outdoor oven. Originally introduced to the Iberian Peninsula by the Moors, it was quickly adopted and carried to all Spanish-occupied lands. The Puebloan Horno was used by Native Americans and early settlers of North America, and became an authentic tradition in the Southwest.

The most iconic characteristic of true New Mexican Cuisine is the use of Hatch Chile, which is not the same as the serrano chile used in Mexican Cuisine.  

Within our local food landscape you will find:

So, what should you be looking for when you are in search of a true, authentic experience of the southwest?

  • Bizcochitos – The Official New Mexican Cookie
  • Carne adovada – slow-cooked cubes of pork marinated in red chile sauce, oregano, and garlic
  • Green chile stew
  • Navajo Tacos – made with fry bread instead of a tortillas
  • Sopapillas – fried pastry dough typically used as an edible scoop for salsas and sauces
  • Albondigas (meatball soup)
  • Chiles Rellenos – whole green chiles stuffed with cheese, dipped in egg batter and fried
  • Enchiladas – corn tortillas filled with chicken, meat or cheese, rolled or stacked and covered with chile sauce and cheese
  • Flan – caramel custard
  • Tamales – meat rolled in cornmeal dough and wrapped in corn husks
  • Indian fry bread – a traditional thick flatbread of deep-fried dough

How to Find Fossils in New Mexico…

This is a question I had to ask! Leonard Witter came out of his Fossil Works lab at the New Mexico Museum of Natural History and Science.

I was watching him through the glass, working on a fossil with a couple of sharp tools, and  a magnifying glass. He was focused, but noticed me staring. I smiled. He also smiled and then came out to see me.

He explained a bit about what he was doing, then I asked a couple of short questions and interrupted his answers by asking the one I really, really wanted to know.

Natural History Museums are a family favorite wherever we go. And the last time we visited Albuquerque, we just had to stop by.

Dad and the kids were almost done looking at the exhibition right next to Fossil Works, and before they came back, I really had to ask how could our family find fossils in the area where we live. I recorded his answer because I thought you would also like to know.