The Jornada Research Institute: From Mongolia To The American Southwest, A Monumental Apache Journey

On Sunday, January 19th, Henrietta Stockel will present at Casa de Suenos
restaurant on some of her most recent research. Her presentation will be
on the arrival of the Apache and their long journey here.

The Jornada Research Institute has arranged to occupy the south room of the restaurant, beginning at 6:00 pm for dinner for those who wish to have a meal before Henrietta’s presentation.
Announce yourself to the receptionist at the restaurant as attending the
JRI presentation.

We anticipate her presentation beginning at 6:45, after most have finished their meal, and we should conclude before 8:00 pm.

Seating is limited ca. 40 although we may be able to make room for a few
more. Dinner is not required but we appreciate your patronage of Casa de
Suenos for making this space available to us. Drinks are also available.

As participants in storytelling format, listeners join with H. Henrietta Stockel on a timeless Apache journey from Mongolia to southern Arizona,
southern New Mexico and northern Mexico. The audience learns previously
unknown facts about the people’s challenges along the way such as
geographical impediments, the climate, spirituality, and footwear. As a
recognized scholar of Apache history, Henrietta has accumulated a lengthy
resume’ of accomplishments, publications, and expertise on the Apaches.

Henrietta received her BA from Columbia University in 1972. Over the years, she has over 70 published articles on the history and cultures of the peoples of the southwest, with emphasis on Chiricahua Apache culture and history. She has 12 published books (listed below) and is working on a 13th, which is the focus of her presentation on January 19 th .

She has also appeared as an expert in two documentaries – one on Geronimo (1992, A & E, and History Channel) and one on the effects of tuberculosis among the Chiricahua Apache prisoners of war (1993, PBS) and was interviewed for a Television program: Arizona Illustrated – KUAT – Chiricahua Apache Culture and History – September 2004.

Henrietta has received several awards for her contributions to the study of the Apache cultures and is widely recognized for her expertise.

In addition, Henrietta has served as Adjunct Professor – Cochise College, Sierra Vista, Arizona, 1998-2008 on Chiricahua Apache Culture and History, as Emeritus lecturer – New Mexico State University – Alamogordo, Fall 2011 on “History in a Jiffy – The Apaches: Cultural transition, Cultural dispossession, Cultural oppression, Cultural recovery;” and as an Ethnohistorical consultant to an archeological project – Apache Moccasins in Utah Cave – University of Alberta – Edmonton, Canada, in 2015.

She is also the Co-Founder of the Southern New Mexico Public Lands Alliance (2016); appointed as a member of Otero County Public Lands Use Advisory Council (2017); is a Co-Founder of the Chiricahua Apache Research Center in Portal, Arizona (2018); and appointed as member at large to the Tularosa Basin Historical Society (2018).


We are fortunate to have Henrietta settle in Tularosa and extremely lucky to have her speak tonight on her recent studies with her presentation tonight entitled: From Mongolia to the American Southwest: A Monumental Apache Journey.

A Day Trip for History Lovers!

Whether you are coming from Las Cruces, Albuquerque, Roswell, or Artesia and visiting the Lincoln Forest Circuit this will only be a 1:22 minute drive (according to Google).

If you are into history, short on time and trying to get the best into one day trip; this will be it.

What to do at each site will depend on your personal tastes. There is camping, hiking, and other activities I have not gone into detail here because it is supposed to be a short trip.
I will be posting more themed day trips sure to inspire you and make you want to come and visit…again, again and again.

The Art Trail

When you visit the Lincoln Forest Circuit and everything-art is your favorite part of a trip, knowing where to spend your time needs some planning. On this map I have included galleries, artist studios, and places where you will have access to our best local artists.

Visiting the Lincoln National Forest in New Mexico the easy way…

The Lincoln National Forest in New Mexico is part of the 154 national forests and 20 national grasslands in the United States administered by the USFS (United States Forest Service).
It is composed of 1,103,897 acres of forest proclaimed in 1902 as the Lincoln Forest Preserve.

With three ranger districts; The Sacramento, The Smokey Bear, and the Guadalupe districts, all contain parts of four different mountain ranges, including a good variety of environmental areas as well. Ranging from desert to heavily forested mountains and sub-alpine grasslands.

The Lincoln Forest Circuit is a network of communities in and around the Lincoln National Forest interconnected through Highway 70, 54, and 380 forming a circuit and making your visit easy. Traveling through the Circuit you will be able to enjoy the best things within our communities and the vast natural landmarks that surround our beautiful landscape.

Armed with this strategical piece of knowledge, you are now only in need of a map with a list of all the best places you must visit in order to enjoy the best experiences in our area. This is that list, with zero fluff!